Memory and nostalgia

Memory, nostalgia are a part of food.

A part of the socio-psychological infrastructure of a community is it’s food practices and rituals. The rituals, mores related to it, have a binding quality. At the same time these are the reason for oppression in many ways. But how are they oppressive? Let’s break it down in a way where one can dissect and examine it.

Food is an integral part of a life as it provides the nutrition needed but also a social fact wherein it is consumed in an environment that has the companions, significant others that participate in the process. If ready food is bought as compared to being cooked in a household, it has an easy albeit a monetary value but is also a matter of affordability and can be seen in two ways. If you can afford to buy optimal, nutritious and good food, then you belong to the high income economic bracket. If you are unable to buy it but instead buy sub-optimal, low on nutrition, cheap food then you belong to the low income category. There are variations to this which can be explained but that is another write-up.

Food when associated with a household kitchen and is cooked for meals each day, interrupts lives on a daily basis and this interruption is something of an ongoing challenge that can be examined closely. It is in a sense oppressive as one is always having to think of food for the self, for the offspring and maybe a partner if that is available. First it is about tastes, likes and dislikes of all the people mentioned; and next, it is about tradition that may or may not be healthy and third, it is about preparation- which is all work with a set agenda. This is an interruption because it keeps one away from engaging in otherwise useful pursuits. (And yes, there is an argument to be made for making this interruption a useful pursuit in and of itself).

Some of the tropes that come to mind while growing up are stories around food, festivals, rituals, ways of life that are still the binding factor for families and communities. Food is about the nostalgia and at the same time a battleground for oppression.

Malini Waghray is the founder, editor, immersive researcher and developer at Choosing Wellness.