Category: movement

On Hands

My dear friend Laj Waghray has made a lovely documentary titled “On Hands”. She filmed artists, gardeners, musicians and crafters who use their hands to create their art or the product.

My commentary on hands is much more prosaic. Last year I developed carpal tunnel syndrome. My hands became tingly, then numb and painful and then so weak I started dropping things. I had never stopped to consider how much I needed my hands. Cooking, cleaning, folding clothes, washing my hair and even brushing became almost impossible. I started using a dictation program on my computer and voice recognition on my phone. I’m an avid reader and turning pages or holding a Kindle became painful. I couldn’t paint or draw which usually helped me relax. I couldn’t do yoga -many exercises put pressure on my hands. Even driving was hard- holding the steering wheel hurt.

My hand surgeon recommended, well, hand surgery .. but I had to exhaust all other options first. In the meanwhile my family really stepped in and took over “my” tasks including my teenage son who did a lot of cooking  and meals! One night while cleaning up the kitchen my son turned to me a little tired and frustrated by the mess and said.. “Mom you do this every night…putting things away and picking up things left around”. I said “Yes.. I do”.

After a few months of trying therapy, acupuncture and steroid shots I had the carpal tunnel release done. I decided to do both hands at  once so I wouldn’t have to miss too much work.

During my recovery I had to rely entirely on my husband for simple tasks like eating, drinking, dressing, combing my hair and tooth brushing. But as functions returned rapidly I gained a new appreciation for these two hands, like the joy of clipping your own nails or squeezing shampoo from a bottle. Chopping vegetables and cooking again was not a chore but gave me a feeling of independence. I didn’t even mind folding laundry! I’m still working on getting back to yoga- that Downward Dog puts too much pressure on the scars. But I can hold a book and I can pick up a baby at work without being afraid I might drop her. We take so many things for granted. This has helped me truly appreciate the simple things my hands do for me.

Svapna Sabnis is a pediatrician, mom and a wife. She is in private practice and is Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics Medical College of Wisconsin and Clinical Adjunct Professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. She is an immunization advocate and Director of Immunize Milwaukee and the Wisconsin Council on Immunization Practices. She is on the board of several peer reviewed journals and an active contributor to research work.

She loves to teach medical students and residents, was awarded the Best Doctors in America 2010- 2017. She is coauthor of a textbook –Pediatric Decision Making Strategies. She likes to garden and dabbles in watercolors in her free time. She’s still trying to have it all and achieve balance in her life.

The “no-excuse” guide to making time to workout

We know the importance of exercise and how it can help us stay physically active, mentally alert and emotionally happy. Most of us have access to multiple gyms in our neighborhood that offer a fun variety of classes. We also have good intentions to develop exercise routines and sometimes we start out strong, but most people struggle to maintain consistency with their workouts.

As a fitness coach, I often hear people say that they don’t have time to work out. We juggle work, families, multiple passions and are burnt by the end of the day. I would like to share my top 10 NO EXCUSE tips to help you fit a workout routine into your lifestyle. Ready, set, go:

Win the mind, win the body

Some of the busiest, most successful people in the world swear by their exercise routine and credit their workouts as one of the reasons for their efficiency and success. So, remind yourself that if they can do it, so can you.

Baby Steps

Sometimes we have an all or nothing approach to fitness, which is why gyms are packed from January 1st to the 15th. I recommend you commit to going 1-2 times a week at first and when you have consistently done that for a month, then add another day and so on.

Don’t try to be a superhero

You don’t have to do it all yourself. Ask family members to pitch in with household duties, and support you in your health goals. Remember that if you are healthy and strong, you will be able to do more for yourself and everyone around you.

Make it fun

If you hate running, don’t invest in a treadmill. Find a workout you enjoy and chances are you will show up more often if you enjoy it. Try out a new class in your neighborhood, most gyms offer free trials to attract new clients.

Find an accountability partner

Find a friend or family member who will hold you accountable. Someone who will actually send you reminders and check in with you or become your gym buddy.

Rome wasn’t built in a day

Changing your habits is one of the hardest things to do. Be patient and focus on progress not perfection. Think big, but start small.

Set up fun rewards

For every week that you make it to your goal, put a dollar or more in a gym jar or give yourself an NFR (Non-Food Reward). A mani-pedi or coffee with a friend, or a new dress can serve as a fun incentive to get you to the gym.

Attitude of Gratitude

Remember that there are so many people in the world who cannot work out due to injuries or limitations or financial reasons. If you have the physical ability to work out and you can afford a gym membership, then be grateful for your body and keep it in the best shape possible.

Sign up for a charity 5K or an obstacle race

Find a local race in the upcoming months and use that to get yourself going. Sometimes the pressure of an upcoming event can push you to show up and be more consistent in your workouts.

Hire a fitness coach

If you absolutely cannot get your mojo going, you may want to invest in a coach who can get you going with fun workouts and accountability until you develop a routine of your own.

IT’S NOT ABOUT HAVING TIME, IT’S ABOUT MAKING TIME

Chitra Rochlani of Livingston, New Jersey is a NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine) certified personal trainer, Precision Nutrition Coach and owner of FIT WARRIOR CHITRA and works in Florham Park, New Jersey. In 2014, Chitra had a life-changing personal transformation when she lost 80 lbs. and she uses this personal experience to inspire and motivate her clients to get lean, strong and fit. Her motto is “Win the mind, win the body” and she believes that fitness, nutrition and mindset are the three pillars of success and contribute to lasting change. Follow her on Instagram and Facebook.

One round of sadhana or practice

You start your day on a beautiful note, you are already happy because this is your time and not anyone else’s. Everyone can wait because it is 4.30 in the morning and the whole world around you is asleep. Nobody is likely to wake up, you know that for sure. For a yogi, it is very important that you are on your own, just for some time, so that you can enjoy the time with everyone around you later. You don’t want to be alone all the time!

So what do we do and how does it start? You take the yoga mat and get ready. You stand on the mat and you are thinking, what do I do? Do I do the Surya Namaskar today or a full stretch or do I do my own personal sequence? That confusion is going on in the mind and you are debating and enjoying the debate and finally you decide. And as you are doing it, you are moving your body, you are doing your warm up. Once the warm up is over, the body is naturally flowing into a comfortable rhythm of stretches. The hands automatically go up, the shoulders go up, the feet are firm on the ground and your attention is on your breath, eyes are closed and you decide- today you decide that the plan is to stay in the asanas- so you start with the Surya Namaskar.

Everyday you can decide to do something. You can do a lot of asanas one day or you decide to focus on the breath or you only move the body slowly. You will decide sometimes that to go deep into the posture or sometimes you may not be well, and have a pain or a catch somewhere and you decide to focus on that for a few minutes, dwell on that and see where it goes. Each day is a new decision on the yoga mat. The unfolding of the mat is a new story and what the body does, the mind helps out- it is far from a rote mechanism.

You start breathing, you start listening to the silent sounds around you. Actually, there are no sounds at this time in the morning, apart from one or two stray vehicles moving on the road. Your practice is going on and it’s almost like 10-15 minutes of asanas, stretches with deepening them and enjoying on the mat.

From far away, you start hearing a familiar sound which says it is that time. It is almost a quarter to five now because the birds wake up at this time. This is your company every morning, these are all familiar people to you, you are aware of these sounds. You are aware of your breath, aware of your body. You take deep breaths and continue into your asanas, continue into the movement. Something makes you continue in the asanas, you recall how you saw this person do this complicated stretch and say let me give it a try. Let me get into this complicated version of the pigeon pose and you try to get into it, you get it right on the right side of the body and not on the left side of the body- it is okay to do that. It probably needs a little more practice- it will happen eventually.

With that in mind, some happiness is swelling over within you already, some peace is turning within you and you are enjoying that. You are enjoying that your breath is becoming easier, body is becoming lighter. Now you want to sit and do the pranayam, the breathing excercises. You sit, absorb the effect of the asanas and allow the body to meditate for a few minutes, maybe 4-5 minutes then start the pranayams. You get into vajrasana, and do the first stage of pranayam with the awareness of the Ujjayi breath, slow and sure. You remind yourself that you will be doing the pranayams like a warrior. The pranayams, one by one, make you more calm and soft in the mind. Now you are done with the pranayam, you do the Sudarshan Kriya. You take a decision that you will do the Kriya like it is the first time you are doing it.

You become aware of the sohums, the in-breaths and the out-breaths. The patterns, the counts and you are lost in them and then you have reached the last round and you close your eyes and just sit. So many thoughts would have been going on all the time, so much planning going on all the time in the mind since the moment you started to climb on the mat. Now it has all vanished, it is just silent. You are aware of the birds chirping but something in the mind is silent. Very silent and calm. You don’t know how much time you spent sitting after the Kriya and meditation, but you know for sure there is no rush, nothing to rush about. There is plenty of time. Everything will be rushed during the day but this cannot be rushed. Slowly you get up, you open your eyes. A chant is forming on the lips- what is that? You say the chants, and again for a minute or two, you absorb the sounds of the chants and feel a burst of energy inside you. As if you can conquer anything, the assurance that nothing is impossible. And that calm is going to see you through the day, is going to see you through many days to come. And that is nothing but the high energy that the pranayam brings, the warm up and yoga brings. You feel the energy- it is a strange feeling but people who do this everyday, feel this. You feel new again. And this is the one round of sadhana or practice.

by Meena Waghray is a yoga teacher but she says, it was not easy to adapt it in her lifestyle. She started out being a pessimist about yoga and has gone on to become a teacher and her journey of fitness in body and mind continues. For her, yoga is not just the daily practice on the mat, rather, the losing and finding of the mind and breath to come back to harmony.

Meena is a lawyer by profession and a mediation expert, trained with the ADR Group London. Mediation according to her is the best way to resolve disputes, even before they reach the courts. Meena loves teaching and has been teaching legal studies for classes 11th and 12th at Army Public School, Bangalore.

She says, “I have two similar goals and similar sounding ones too, separated by a “t”, meditation and mediation. One is spiritual and the other is legal. The end result of both is harmony”. Meena is a volunteer/
faculty with the Art of Living Foundation facilitating Art of Living Yoga and Happiness Programs.


Movement

fluids

As one sits through the day at a screen without movement (like I have for the last two hours, looking at the clock) and wonder at the amazing technology- I also lock up the circulatory system in a set route and obstruct energy movement. A physical movement keeps the body fluids in motion and at the same time registers the food energy to the remotest parts of the body if one were to think of the gut as the center.

The idea of movement, be it with yoga or with cardio, strength training or zumba, the rhythm of the body changes and takes on the form of the activity. The lymphatic fluid or blood- need to circulate and that is of essence.

What does yoga mean to you?

Every time you take a decision not to smoke and stop it,
you decide to stop drinking and actually do it,
you decide to eat right and do that,
you decide to sit down and close your eyes just like that.

Every time you took that paint brush and let go some colours on the canvas,
you picked up the phone to talk to someone you did not in a long time,
sat in the car after reaching the destination, just finished the song you were singing along,
kneeled down to speak to a child instead of standing,
curled up for hours with a book,
listened to someone 100%,
or simply got absorbed in the sound of the rustling leaves of that huge tree.

Every time Yoga happened.

Just increase those moments.
You don’t have to take the mat always for Yoga.
It’s our natural state of being. A Union.
A union of body, mind and soul.
What is your Yoga?

#promisetoyoga #yogaeveryday #InternationalYogaDay #HumFitTohIndiaFit

Meena Waghray is a yoga teacher but she says, it was not easy to adapt it in her lifestyle. She started out being a pessimist about yoga and has gone on to become a teacher and her journey of fitness in body and mind continues. For her, yoga is not just the daily practice on the mat, rather, the losing and finding of the mind and breath to come back to harmony.

Meena is a lawyer by profession and a mediation expert, trained with the ADR Group London. Mediation according to her is the best way to resolve disputes, even before they reach the courts. Meena loves teaching and has been teaching legal studies for classes 11th and 12th at Army Public School, Bangalore.

She says, “I have two similar goals and similar sounding ones too, separated by a “t”, meditation and mediation. One is spiritual and the other is legal. The end result of both is harmony”. Meena is a volunteer/
faculty with the Art of Living Foundation facilitating Art of Living Yoga and Happiness Programs.