The inevitable dawning of common sense

The physical body over the mental- which comes first? Is it the chicken or the egg? Or is it easier than that? I practiced the mental well being for far too long and got hit by the lack of the physical care that was needed. Hence the effort to get to the core of it and understand how both are connected.

The inevitable dawning of common sense

For a number of years, the refining of the thought process to understand a social problem (as a sociologist) was to me a far critical issue to work towards. It has been a default setting for the longest time I could remember. The idea of “seeking help” was not an option to fix this lack of understanding- if at all that came about. I always knew that the most nonsensical of the problems has a solution, if only one reads more about it or finds ways to newer understandings and the truth I might seek would unravel in front of me.

The mind-body connection, or the physical-body problem in the form of high BMI, is a new one that life has dealt in a fashion that now cannot be ignored. This is a warning sign of what’s more to come soon. On the other hand, the lack of a right mind-set that makes you a misfit in a certain circle, like your brilliant class mates in a Sociology class, was a warning sign too. I clarified concepts by reading more and more, to arrive at an understanding that not only made me the wiser but also got the grades I was looking for.

The physical body however, took a while to give me the warning sign and working to fix that is what this dashboard or a thesis is about. Contact our editor to contribute to the dashboard as a writer.

Malini Waghray is the founder, editor, immersive researcher and developer at Choosing Wellness.

What the mandala taught me.

The Tibetan monks who came from Hubli, Karnataka had this to teach today at the Princeton Center for Yoga and Health. How to do a job well, to focus on one item at any time and breathe in with it, taking it all in. They are mindful of creating the mandala- they focus on the process. The process consists of first making a draft of the mandala with the outline on the surface. Then using colored sand, pouring it into the cones with holes at the ends. Then you inhale and exhale lightly, settle down by bending into a comfortable position and start tapping the sand onto the design. You orchestrate your hands to move the cone a few millimeters a second to create the pattern- and all this while continuously breathing. This is an ongoing process for 6-8 days to create a beautiful mandala.

The whole point of this activity then is to do a job well and wait for the beauty to come through (or not). This is an example for how any piece of work needs to be done. The end result may not be a visible product like the mandala here. It could be a small task taken to it’s end, accomplished well.

After creating the mandala, there is a ceremony done to celebrate its beauty and the aspect of working and accomplishing something together. The monks then let go of the beauty in the mandala by sweeping the sand up- the work is done and done well. The essence of it is gathered while creating it -it is this essence which we find common in the doctrine of mindfulness. It is knowing that what needs to be done is a “do-now”. It is the “do-now” that one needs to focus upon, this moment. The rest will follow through.

Malini Waghray is the founder, editor, immersive researcher and developer at Choosing Wellness.

(Picture Credits: https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16371236)

about cholesterol

Target Numbers for Asian Indians to Prevent Heart Disease
Non HDL Cholesterol less than 130 mg/dl [152]
(Total Cholesterol-HDL= Non HDL Cholesterol)

LDL-Cholesterol less than 100 mg/dl [126]

HDL-Cholesterol greater than 40 mg/dl for males and greater than 50 mg/dl for females [45]

Blood pressure: less than 140/80 mm
Waist Circumference: less than 35″ for men and less than 31″ for women

What is HDL cholesterol
High-density lipoprotein is a part of the total cholesterol measurement. It is often referred to as “good” cholesterol. The recommended level for men with diabetes is greater than 40mg/dl and for women with diabetes is greater than 50 mg/dl.

What is LDL cholesterol
Low-density lipoprotein is a part of the total cholesterol in the blood. It is often referred to as “bad” cholesterol. LDL should be less than 70mg/dl for those with diabetes and/or heart disease.

Dietary Recommendations to reduce LDL (bad) cholesterol level
The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III recommends:
1. Adjust caloric intake to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. Weight gain raises LDL (bad) cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood.
2. Choose a diet low in saturated fat (less than 7% of caloric intake), trans-fat (less than 1 % of caloric intake) and dietary cholesterol (less than 200 mg/day) by consuming a diet high in fish (especially fatty fish), non-fat dairy products, small amounts of lean meat and/or lean meat alternatives e.g. dry beans e.g. rajma, channa, soybeans (like edamame), lentils (daal) and tofu.
3. Include food sources of plant sterols & stanols. At the recommended dosage of 2 gm per day, plant sterols reduce cholesterol absorption in the intestine by up to 30% and reduce LDL “bad” cholesterol by 10%. Plant sterols have the same chemical structure as animal cholesterol which blocks the absorption of cholesterol eaten in the diet as well as
cholesterol manufactured by the liver.
4. Increase intake of viscous (soluble) fiber to 7-13g daily e.g. oats, fruits such as strawberries, apples, vegetables such as okra, eggplant, brussel sprouts and legumes such as lentils. Soluble fiber can lower LDL cholesterol 3-5%.  It is recommended that adults eat 21 to 38 grams of total fiber daily.

Source: Indian Foods: AAPI’s Guide to Nutrition, Health and Diabetes
Edited by RANJITA MISRA Professor & Research Director, Texas A&M University

Movement

fluids

As one sits through the day at a screen without movement (like I have for the last two hours, looking at the clock) and wonder at the amazing technology- I also lock up the circulatory system in a set route and obstruct energy movement. A physical movement keeps the body fluids in motion and at the same time registers the food energy to the remotest parts of the body if one were to think of the gut as the center.

The idea of movement, be it with yoga or with cardio, strength training or zumba, the rhythm of the body changes and takes on the form of the activity. The lymphatic fluid or blood- need to circulate and that is of essence.

Remedies

HEART HEALTHY

What is heart healthy and why? Understand what it means to stay healthy! Be proactive about testing for diseases- know your challenges with genes and with your environment. Be equipped to deal with it. Coming soon- engage with your fitness calculators to enable better eating and working out. Know when to exercise more and do it. Find out about fitness classes around you and take on the extra work during the holidays. We all have the time to do it if you get it all together.

Tawa Masala

Sometimes I jot down a recipe in any form and place and use it aplenty later. It becomes a staple because someone loved it a lot. And that’s how I roll when I look for favorites- I ask my family or friends for a recipe and they share it or I write it down. This tawa masala recipe survived my two iPhone notes-app and lived through a toilet bowl flush- almost. Then I salvaged it into an email folder that still survives- technology! Continue reading “Tawa Masala”

Cauliflower

I make cauliflower in the old fashioned way with potatoes sauteed in oil and zeera. Slightly crunchy, slightly caramelized with a sprinkling of turmeric, salt and pepper. It is an amazing dish that over a period of time I changed to make without potatoes altogether and it still tastes great.

Slightly crunchy and slightly caramelized sounds oxymoron-ish since if you let it caramelize, it also becomes soft and looses the crunch. The way I do it is over high heat as I put the veggies in the oil and cover it. As soon as I see the steam escape from the sides I know to take off the lid and let the vegetables stick to the bottom of the pan and in essence, caramelize it. Toss it a few times if they are not done and repeat for a couple of minutes with the lid shut.

Continue reading “Cauliflower”

An Indian salad

Salads in India are a summer solution to extreme heat. The fruits and vegetables are the juiciest during summer. The reason being that there is ample sunshine to hasten the growth and along with enough water- they reach a full growth potential.

Salads when added to the plate take on the burden of providing roughage as well as the cooling quality to the spicy food. We see a lot of salads have curds and buttermilk added to add to the cooling element. This salad is a standard one of chopped variety that uses firm vegetables most of the time. Continue reading “An Indian salad”

What does yoga mean to you?

Every time you take a decision not to smoke and stop it,
you decide to stop drinking and actually do it,
you decide to eat right and do that,
you decide to sit down and close your eyes just like that.

Every time you took that paint brush and let go some colours on the canvas,
you picked up the phone to talk to someone you did not in a long time,
sat in the car after reaching the destination, just finished the song you were singing along,
kneeled down to speak to a child instead of standing,
curled up for hours with a book,
listened to someone 100%,
or simply got absorbed in the sound of the rustling leaves of that huge tree.

Every time Yoga happened.

Just increase those moments.
You don’t have to take the mat always for Yoga.
It’s our natural state of being. A Union.
A union of body, mind and soul.
What is your Yoga?

#promisetoyoga #yogaeveryday #InternationalYogaDay #HumFitTohIndiaFit

Meena Waghray is a yoga teacher but she says, it was not easy to adapt it in her lifestyle. She started out being a pessimist about yoga and has gone on to become a teacher and her journey of fitness in body and mind continues. For her, yoga is not just the daily practice on the mat, rather, the losing and finding of the mind and breath to come back to harmony.

Meena is a lawyer by profession and a mediation expert, trained with the ADR Group London. Mediation according to her is the best way to resolve disputes, even before they reach the courts. Meena loves teaching and has been teaching legal studies for classes 11th and 12th at Army Public School, Bangalore.

She says, “I have two similar goals and similar sounding ones too, separated by a “t”, meditation and mediation. One is spiritual and the other is legal. The end result of both is harmony”. Meena is a volunteer/
faculty with the Art of Living Foundation facilitating Art of Living Yoga and Happiness Programs.

touristing at the mandi

I went around the mandi for my vegetables and was chased by young boys looking to sell their wares: small clips, rubber bands, candles, nadas, agarbathis. It is an incessant force at the mandi to get your work done and not be distracted by the small kids who try to make a living. They are like guides to the mandi but at the same time we are short-term visitors who lug back our goods and disappear like tourists, like onlookers.

The phool mandi in Hyderabad, Jam Bagh as the old timers know it, is one such place that has changed faces. Now we also have flower markets in Gudimalkapur one of the largest flower markets in Hyderabad that gets the flowers from Shankarpally, Chevella, Vikarabad. Things change and not remain the same and it makes for the case of wabi-sabi, the way imperfections last.