Tag: art

Fault Lines

Artist Statement: Conceptually driven and thematic, my work is a way to process everything that is going on around me. Experiences are distilled and sewn together by research in the studio and through reading. Recent political rhetoric has shifted the direction of my work towards notions of identity, belonging and assimilation. My practice has become a series of propositions, a way of bridging the sociopolitical with the aesthetic. I invite the viewer to experience what is felt rather than what they hear in the news through installation and haptic strategies.

Fault Lines:

  • Gaza Strip
  • Syria / Turkey
  • North Korea / South Korea
  • Mexico / USA
  • India / Pakistan

Five fabric panels suspended in a row from ceiling overhead, inspired by the door hangings from Gujarat, India
Embroidery on silk organza
21” X 48” each


“Fault lines” draws parallels between a country’s borders and a home’s doorway – both interstitial spaces that divide the insider and the outsider. Door hangings like the ones used in Helen Louise Allen Textile Collection have been used to welcome good spirits and guests into the home for centuries and are also deeply tied to the Indian aesthetic and spiritual culture. Borders on the other hand define a country, acting as gatekeepers for a secure and safe nation. But they are also portals to other places, to safety, prosperity and security. However, they are often the most treacherous and contentious passageways and remain examples of a divided and fragmented globe. In this work, I use the interstitial form of a door hanging to speak about some of the most dangerous borders in the world at the current moment– the Gaza Strip, Syria and Turkey, US and Mexico, India and Pakistan, North Korea and South Korea. I imagine what it would be like if these borders became welcome ports and the line between insider and outsider is blurred.
I bring in my long-term interest in ritual, the body’s relationship to space, and viewer engagement. The extensive history of narrative embroidery techniques became an inspiration to create these “door hangings”. By walking under this row of door hangings, the viewers symbolically cross the most dangerous land borders in the world. I urge viewers to think about the earth as a global village and borders as portals for human and material exchanges rather than fault lines where lives are lost.

 Nirmal Raja is an interdisciplinary artist living and working in Milwaukee. She approaches her practice as a process of sifting and communicating sensations and ideas with varied materials and processes. Conceptually driven and thematic, her work straddles the personal and the political and is a response to lived experiences that are distilled and strengthened by research in the studio and through reading. She examines notions of memory, identity, place and belonging. Performative collaborations with other artists and the larger community have recently become part of her practice. Occasionally, she curates exhibitions and organizes and facilitates situations that articulate moments of connection and empathy.

Wrapping Air in Cloth

“Wrapping Air in Cloth” uses a universal form of wrapping one’s belongings in a piece of cloth. Except these are empty shells that allude to the innumerable lives lost at the border when people flee danger and poverty. I am in search of forms that have multiple meanings.  This one in particular has many – on a physical level, it could stand in for the body and breath, on a metaphysical level, it could stand in for transience and how nothing belongs to us. On a global level it is the universal and ancient form of carrying one’s belongings and on a political level, it could symbolize all the lives lost when refugees risk life and limb in the hope of a better life.

 Nirmal Raja is an interdisciplinary artist living and working in Milwaukee. She approaches her practice as a process of sifting and communicating sensations and ideas with varied materials and processes. Conceptually driven and thematic, her work straddles the personal and the political and is a response to lived experiences that are distilled and strengthened by research in the studio and through reading. She examines notions of memory, identity, place and belonging. Performative collaborations with other artists and the larger community have recently become part of her practice. Occasionally, she curates exhibitions and organizes and facilitates situations that articulate moments of connection and empathy.

Literature and Art #LitArt


Now, the use of culture is that it helps us, by means of its spiritual standard of perfection, to regard wealth as but machinery, and not only to say as a matter of words that we regard wealth as but machinery, but really to perceive and feel that it is so. If it were not for this purging effect wrought upon our minds by culture, the whole world, the future, as well as the present, would inevitably belong to the Philistines. The people who believe most that our greatness and welfare are proved by our being very rich, and who most give their lives and thoughts to becoming rich, are just the people whom we call the Philistines. Culture says: “Consider these people, then, their way of life, their habits, their manners, the very tones of their voices; look at them attentively; observe the literature they read, the things which give them pleasure, the words which come forth out of their mouths, the thoughts which make the furniture of their minds; would any amount of wealth be worth having with the condition that one was to become just like these people by having it?”

Matthew Arnold,  Culture and Anarchy (1869)