Tag: food

“Cancer? Yes, obesity causes cancer!”

“Being overweight is not good for you, you can get diabetes or have heart disease”. This is something we all hear frequently and know for a fact. What we don’t hear and many of us don’t know is that being overweight and obese also causes cancer! Yes, that disease that we all fear CANCER. In fact, it can cause up to thirteen different types of cancer. This includes cancers with some of the worst outcomes like oesophageal and pancreatic and those linked to reproductive organs like womb and ovarian.  This is in addition to the risk from diabetes and heart disease that we are all familiar with. With obesity levels rising globally it is currently the second biggest cause of preventable cancers after tobacco use and we must do more to reduce rates. 

The way that obesity and extra weight can cause cancer can be considered complex but as the diagram shows very simply, the extra fat cells are active and lead to an excess production of hormones and growth factors.  These in turn stimulate key cells to divide increasing the risk of mutation and cancer cells being produced.  It is the mutation through cell division that leads to a cancer cell in the body that rapidly divides to form a tumor.

There are many factors that contribute to obesity but we know that the best way to reduce your weight to a healthy body mass index (Height cm/Weight kg; 18.5-24.9) is to eat healthily and reduce the amount of foods that are high in fats sugars and salt (HFSS).

Currently the evidence shows the link between obesity and cancer in adults BUT we do know that if a child is overweight and obese, they are 5 times more than likely to become an overweight adult with an increased cancer risk, in addition to the risk of diabetes and heart disease.  All have high associated health costs. Knowing this it is vital that we do more to support children to eat healthy.

There are many things around us that constantly tempt and encourage us all but especially children, to see, want and buy these HFSS foods – from marketing to price promotions.  Research from Cancer Research UK has shown that for every extra broadcast advert a child watches a week they are likely to consume an extra 350 calories/week!!

Obesity rates are rising globally and if we don’t do anything it will overtake smoking as the leading cause of cancer.  It has a large health risk associated with it financially, physically and mentally and we must do more to prevent it.  Raising our awareness of the health risk posed from obesity is a start and combined with doing more to reduce the increasingly “obesogenic” (obesity friendly) environment we are living in, we can start to hopefully turn this epidemic around.

References:

Brown KF, Rumgay H, Dunlop C, et al. Thefraction of cancer attributable to modifiable risk factors in England, Wales,Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the United Kingdom in 2015. British Journal ofCancer 2018; 118(8): 1130-41.

https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/causes-of-cancer/obesity-weight-and-cancer/does-obesity-cause-cancer#Obesity0

“Under Pressure: New evidence on youngpeople’s broadcast marketing exposure in the UK”. 2018. Christopher Thomas,Lucie Hooper, Gillian Rosenberg, Fiona Thomas, Jyotsna Vohra. https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/sites/default/files/under_pressure.pdf

Jyotsna Vohra PhD is Head of the Cancer Policy Research Center at Cancer Research UK, where she is responsible for ensuring that there is robust evidence to support policy calls that will improve cancer patients care and outcomes. Jyotsna established this center for the largest independent funder into cancer research, globally, in 2014. 

As part of its remit her team has led the way providing evidence to show how population measures can reduce the number of preventable cancers that are caused by behaviors such as tobacco use, obesity and alcohol consumption.  Her work has been included in key UK government health plans/strategies, consultations and presented at key government select committees not to mention nationally and internationally at key conferences and meetings.

Jyotsna has previously worked for the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health as their Research Manager and is passionate about ensuring equitable access to healthcare for all. She believes that if you have the ambition you will reach your goal and is a fan of the phrase “reach for the stars and you may reach the tree tops, but if you only ever reach for tree tops you will most likely hit the ground” and that’s how she like to tackle health disparities.  

Aircraft or the body?

When you take up a big task or a project which is going to take up your mental and physical time, you should be discreet about how you use your energy. Viveka means to be aware and take steps to wisely use the resources. But what are the resources and where are they located? They are the mind, body, the physical space around you, the breath and sleep. These are all connected. How are these connected?


If you are sleep deprived, how will be the state of the situation?
How is your mind when the food you eat is either less or more?
How is breath connected with energy? One question leads to another and you see there is a pattern to this connection.


Let’s look at each of the resources individually and as we do that let’s use the analogy of an aircraft to represent the physical body. There are all kinds of aircraft and different levels of care that is required for each of them. The level of care and caution that is given to a two seater, a passenger aircraft and a fighter plane is different based of the use they have. Whatever be the type and need of the machine, we give it the fuel that it needs in the right quantity and right quality.

You don’t substitute diesel for petrol or you don’t put extra fuel in a two seater because you fancy it moving faster- you cannot do that. Similarly, we give our body the right quantity and quality of food. Not too much not too less.

Taste has types, tamasic, rajasic or sattvic.

Rajasic taste is when you eat for taste alone and hence don’t know when to stop. Sattvic taste satiates the mind and body. The food nourishes the body and makes it available for optimum use. Sattvic food keeps the body free from disease and dullness, the less the digestive system has to process the better it is for the physical body which will be available for a variety of endeavors. Food then is one of the resource.

Sleeping recharges our cells and calms the nervous system. With too much sleep and with too little sleep we are not giving our best. An over used aircraft and an aircraft rotting in the hanger, both are not of any use.

There is no fixed standard measure of time that one must sleep. Each body is different and has different sleep requirements. We need to strike our own balance.

Breath, is addressed last with a definite purpose. It is the link between the body and mind; memory and intellect. It’s like a kite and a thread, the kite is controlled by the string and we use our breath to navigate our mind. Keeping the connection with the body to the mind, via the breath is what keeps a balance. Moving away from the roots or disconnecting due to the changes in the breath, causes immense pain in body and mind and reduces our capacity to give our best.

The practice of yogasanas and meditation brings in the balance. Using the aircraft well and giving them a rest in the hangar make for a long lasting and productive machine. Living wisely leads to high productivity, you don’t fall ill often. You don’t feel sluggish when you are expected to be giving your best.

With a little effort in maintaining the breath, to bring the mind to the NOW, to come back to the source is meditation

by Meena Waghray is a yoga teacher but she says, it was not easy to adapt it in her lifestyle. She started out being a pessimist about yoga and has gone on to become a teacher and her journey of fitness in body and mind continues. For her, yoga is not just the daily practice on the mat, rather, the losing and finding of the mind and breath to come back to harmony.

Meena is a lawyer by profession and a mediation expert, trained with the ADR Group London. Mediation according to her is the best way to resolve disputes, even before they reach the courts. Meena loves teaching and has been teaching legal studies for classes 11th and 12th at Army Public School, Bangalore.

She says, “I have two similar goals and similar sounding ones too, separated by a “t”, meditation and mediation. One is spiritual and the other is legal. The end result of both is harmony”. Meena is a volunteer/
faculty with the Art of Living Foundation facilitating Art of Living Yoga and Happiness Programs.

Food rules

We all love to change the traditional ways of making food but what we don’t expect is that we are introducing new elements in the game of cooking. Food is chemistry and what we do to it has repercussions to the end product and hence to our health. It is however a lot of fun to experiment and to explore creative foods and ideas. The problem is that traditional recipes come to us with rules and restrictions and we need to know when and why to make changes to them. Or not. Like cooking spinach with a fat and an acid to make sure the iron is absorbed in the body- something that I did on a regular basis due to tradition but this changed when I put spinach in a smoothie with a banana and yogurt. There was no fat or acid added. Spinach, a green micro-nutrient was a total loss to my system and to the process of setting up a new routine.

And consider dal or lentils.

A nutritionist I follow on instagram Sangeetha Khanna gave me some details on lentils. She posted about the lentil cheela with lots of vegetables and that got me thinking to a time when my father suffered with kidney and liver problems and the doctor suggested eating less toor dal or any dal (lentil). He was a mid-life teetotaler, so alcohol was not the reason for his liver problems. The nutritionist said this about the dal intake- “…Ayurveda has already prescribed ways to prevent the ill effects of lentils. Think about our dal ka tadka (seasoning) with asfoetida, garlic, cumin and chillies or sambar (lentil soup) that is made with tamarind and a tadka or the various fermented lentil preparations. The oxalates and purines in lentils are associated with oxalate type stones in kidney but if lentils are cooked according to Ayurveda prescribed ways and one consumes enough water, there is no need to worry.”

Thank you Sangeetha Khanna for this, and I would suggest you follow her blog and posts for more interesting information on food and nutrition guidance.

Malini Waghray is the founder, editor, immersive researcher and developer at Choosing Wellness.

Memory and nostalgia

Memory, nostalgia are a part of food.

A part of the socio-psychological infrastructure of a community is it’s food practices and rituals. The rituals, mores related to it, have a binding quality. At the same time these are the reason for oppression in many ways. But how are they oppressive? Let’s break it down in a way where one can dissect and examine it.

Food is an integral part of a life as it provides the nutrition needed but also a social fact wherein it is consumed in an environment that has the companions, significant others that participate in the process. If ready food is bought as compared to being cooked in a household, it has an easy albeit a monetary value but is also a matter of affordability and can be seen in two ways. If you can afford to buy optimal, nutritious and good food, then you belong to the high income economic bracket. If you are unable to buy it but instead buy sub-optimal, low on nutrition, cheap food then you belong to the low income category. There are variations to this which can be explained but that is another write-up.

Food when associated with a household kitchen and is cooked for meals each day, interrupts lives on a daily basis and this interruption is something of an ongoing challenge that can be examined closely. It is in a sense oppressive as one is always having to think of food for the self, for the offspring and maybe a partner if that is available. First it is about tastes, likes and dislikes of all the people mentioned; and next, it is about tradition that may or may not be healthy and third, it is about preparation- which is all work with a set agenda. This is an interruption because it keeps one away from engaging in otherwise useful pursuits. (And yes, there is an argument to be made for making this interruption a useful pursuit in and of itself).

Some of the tropes that come to mind while growing up are stories around food, festivals, rituals, ways of life that are still the binding factor for families and communities. Food is about the nostalgia and at the same time a battleground for oppression.

Malini Waghray is the founder, editor, immersive researcher and developer at Choosing Wellness.

How we feed our families…


“…food sits at the intersection of biological or material and symbolic aspects of human life. Food is essential for life because we need its energy and nutrients as biological creatures. But the nature of our humanity lies in our social practices, and thus our ability to sustain ourselves involves more than nutrients. What we eat is a “sign of membership, social status and spiritual worth. Eating the same food as others is a mark of belonging… The practice of feeding a family involves, meeting, what Stone calls “communal needs” which include “community, solidarity, a sense of belonging; dignity, respect, self-esteem, and honor; friendship and love” .

(Stone, 1988)

Food is a social act, in essence, it is about sharing and belonging. The very nature of cooking then starts with pots and plates, meant not just for a singular consumer. Eating alone however, is not an anathema but the process of cooking and eating has come to mean a bit more than sustenance and hence the challenges of sustenance eating. The contradiction is within the logic of food- you have to eat together as humans but you have to eat within your limits.

At this time of thanksgiving in the United States and Diwali in India, the onslaught of food-voices and choices from every possible avenue- it is a nice reminder to put things in perspective and to register this holiday for what it is.

Malini Waghray is the founder, editor, immersive researcher and developer at Choosing Wellness.